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Where to invest $10k: three experts share their picks

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Media stocks

By Ross Greenwood 

$10,000 … one shot … or maybe two. Buy media stocks.

Why? Because expected changes to media ownership laws are going to see a rush by big media companies to buy up smaller rivals. Some of the companies in play: Fairfax Media, Prime Media and Southern Cross Austereo are foremost among them.

The other benefit is that the sector, finally, is seeing an uptick from the overall improvement in the economy, notwithstanding the continued weakness in the retail sector, which generates a big chunk of the advertising dollars.

Ross Greenwood is Channel 9’s finance editor and Radio 2GB’s Money News host

Investment managers

By Marcus Padley

If I know anything about the stockmarket, then the goal is to achieve long-term consistent returns, not gaze at your screen looking for a stock going up tomorrow. It is about quality with an element of growth.

At this moment I would also be looking for a company with international businesses that will benefit out of something I believe could happen from here: a fall in the Australian dollar. It has done its dash.

So I pick Janus Henderson, an investment manager.

It is UK listed and will directly benefit through the translation of the UK price into Australian dollars from a fall in the Australian dollar. It is also a play on a successful Brexit, which I think will happen less painfully than currently expected.

The stock is in an uptrend. It has a $9 billion market cap so is reasonably large (read safer). It yields 4.2%. Results were out on August 8 so the stock is de-risked for the next three to six months. If the dollar falls this is one of the best leveraged stocks on the market.

Marcus Padley is the author of the daily stockmarket newsletter, Marcus Today. Visit marcustoday.com.au for a free trial of the Marcus Today newsletter.

Disruptors

By Nerida Cole

Traditional business models across many sectors – retail, media, banking, health – are under a lot of pressure.

In my view, investing in the companies leading this disruption is a good way to benefit from the new developments and hedge against traditional blue chips. That’s why I’d be putting the $10,000 into the Evans & Partners Global Disruption Fund, which listed on the ASX on August 1, 2017 under the code EGD.

Even though you are buying one investment through the ASX, in turn the fund invests in major global companies that have a proven ability to disrupt and continue to disrupt existing markets and businesses, and will also look at a selection of smaller positions in potential disruptors.

The investment committee guiding the fund has deep insight and experience investing in this theme.

It is a long-term investment, focused on capital growth rather than income, so consider your own circumstances and the risks before investing.

Nerida Cole is managing director of the financial advisory division of Dixon Advisory. She is an expert on super, including self-managed funds, retirement planning and wealth-building strategies.

 

One Comment

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  1. Long term is not the way to go for people my age ( 80 ) and there are many at that age..
    So the way to go for us oldies would be short term as we might not be here tomorrow so to speak.
    Knowing the same thing can happen to the younger generation it’s more likely to happen to us oldies.

    Thank you for receiving my message.

    Roy Dekoke

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